Tag Archives: IAQ

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Testing Services (including chemicals / carcinogens like Formaldehyde) Available – Fast Onsite Results!

Formaldehyde NFPA Diamond from MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet)

Formaldehyde NFPA Diamond from MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet)

ScanTech Technical Consulting performs indoor air quality tests including particulate matter in the air (residential and commercial) in the 0.5 – 2.5 micron and 2.5 micron + range  (PM 2.5 and PM10) in order to evaluate how clean your air is with respect to dust and other fine particles. We also offer formaldehyde and VOC levels testing due to chemicals used in the manufacture of pressed wood flooring, lumber, laminates, glues and other adhesives in your home and factory/office.

More information on formaldehyde can be found here:

http://emfsurveydallas.com/formaldehyde-indoor-air-pollutant-and-testing/

We can also test for VOCs, (Volatile Organic Compounds) CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) levels and O2 oxygen levels in your home to check ventilation quality. Datalogging over time available to show trends and measure the effects of HEPA filtration and electrostatic air ionization units.

Our background in organic and environmental chemistry, epidemiology, advanced microbiology, medical geology  and human physiology makes us uniquely qualified to answer your concerns regarding the invisible environment you breathe every day.

July 2016 ruling by the EPA on the emissions of formaldehyde of wood products produced or imported into the United States:

https://www.epa.gov/formaldehyde/formaldehyde-emission-standards-composite-wood-products-0#additional-resources

The following tables and information are from:

Health Effects Notebook for Hazardous Air Pollutants

To convert concentrations in air (at 25°C) from ppm to mg/m3: mg/m3 = (ppm) × (molecular weight of the compound)/(24.45) For formaldehyde which is CH20: 1 ppm = 1.23 mg/m3.

Explanation of Formaldehyde Levels

Formaldehyde Regulatory and Health Levels Comparison

Formaldehyde Regulatory & Health Levels Comparison

AIHA ERPG–American Industrial Hygiene Association’s emergency response planning guidelines. ERPG 1 is the maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed nearly all individuals could be exposed up to one hour without experiencing other than mild transient adverse health effects or perceiving a clearly defined objectionable odor; ERPG 2 is the maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed nearly all individuals could be exposed up to one hour without experiencing or developing irreversible or other serious health effects that could impair their abilities to take protective action.

ACGIH STEL–American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists’ short-term exposure limit expressed as a time-weighted average exposure; the concentration of a substance which should not be exceeded at any time during a workday.

LC50 (Lethal Concentration50)–A calculated concentration of a chemical in air to which exposure for a specific length of time is expected to cause death in 50% of a defined experimental animal population.

NIOSH IDLH–National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health’s immediately dangerous to life or health limit; NIOSH recommended exposure limit to ensure that a worker can escape from an exposure condition that is likely to cause death or immediate or delayed permanent adverse health effects or prevent escape from the environment.

NIOSH REL–NIOSH’s recommended exposure limit; NIOSH recommended exposure limit for an 8- or 10-h time-weighted average exposure and/or ceiling.

OSHA PEL–Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s permissible exposure limit expressed as a time-weighted average; the concentration of a substance to which most workers can be exposed without adverse effect averaged over a normal 8-h workday or a 40-h workweek.

 

Composition of Dust Particles and Particulate Matter in The Air

When I test for PM2.5 and PM10 which are Fine Particle and Coarse Particle designations used by the EPA, I am often asked what is the nature of this particulate matter. These may also be referred to as TSP (Total Suspended Particulate) or RSP (Respirable Suspended Particulate) matter. While it is very difficult to tell exactly what it is without microscopic analysis and will vary depending on the environment, an educated guess can be made based on what sources are nearby and the potential contribution of those sources based on typical size regimes.

Possible sources are pollen, toxic mold spores, smoke, bacteria, pet dander, construction dust, etc.

There are some useful reference charts that not only talk about the ranges of certain pollutants, but also give an indication of different filtration mediums which are relatively effective in removing these contaminants.

 

Particulate Matter in Air Quality

Air Filtration with Regard to Particle Size

*NOTE – HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters are typically rated at 99.97% efficiency for particles of 0.3 um or larger. At this time, I am not sure that a HEPA filter will remove more than 95% of particles which are 0.01 microns in size as this chart seems to imply.

Also, beware of filters and vacuum cleaners which claim to be “HEPA-like”, “HEPA-type” or “99% HEPA” as these are not true HEPA filters and are often inferior in quality with regard to air filtration efficiency.

BTW – the term DS efficiency mentioned in the Pleated Filter (40% DS ) refers to Atmospheric Dust Spot Efficiency which measures how well a filter removes staining dust from the air.

 

HEPA Air Filtration Particle Ranges

HEPA Filtration Particle Chart

 

Particle Filtration Size Chart HEPA vs. ULPA

Particle Filtration Size Chart HEPA vs. ULPA

 

Characteristics of Particles and Particle Dispersoids

Characteristics of Particles and Particle Dispersoids

This is a fairly technical diagram for general reference use.

 

Origin of Dust Particulate Matter

Origin of Dust Particulate Matter